DENNIS WHEATLEY'S 1ST EDITIONS IN ORDER OF PUBLICATION
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Codeword–Golden Fleece
(click on cover picture for more details)
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Publication date:

[30 May 1946]

Series:

Duc de Richleau and friends in a WW2 espionage adventure.

 

Link to the
de Richleau series in
chronological order

(link to Codeword–Golden Fleece notes) Publisher's synopsis:
When the Second World War opened, the Duke de Richleau and his friends Simon Aron, Rex van Ryn and Richard Eaton–the indomitable four–were in Poland. Here is the story of how they came to be there and found themselves even before the outbreak of hostilities involved in a most damnable conspiracy. In Codeword–Golden Fleece the scenes of intrigue, violence and escape in Warsaw are exceeded only by those which follow in Bucharest–whence the friends are carried in a desperate attempt to sabotage Hitler's war economy and force Germany to ask for peace before she can muster her full might for an assault on Western Europe.

(1963 Arrow): It can now be revealed that the plot of Codeword–Golden Fleece is based on fact. Actually, it was given to Dennis Wheatley when he was a member of the Joint Planning Staff of the War Cabinet by a Foreign Office colleague there. On behalf of the Allied governments a French nobleman did actually succeed in acquiring a controlling interest in the Danube oil barges and their tugs. The Germans failed with the Vichy government in an action for its return and half the Fleet had been got out to Turkish waters. Supplies of fuel for the Luftwaffe were seriously crippled by this ingenious secret stroke.

Known reprints:
1950, 1952, 1957
  (1950 reprint cover for Codeword–Golden Fleece)  
  1950; 1952; 1957  

Come Into My Parlour
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(link to Come Into My Parlour notes) Publication date:

[28 November 1946]

Series:

A Gregory Sallust WW2 espionage novel

 

Link to the
Gregory Sallust series in
chronological order

Publisher's synopsis:
Come Into My Parlour is the fifth of seven volumes incorporating all the principal events which occurred between September, 1939, and May 1945, covering the activities of Gregory Sallust, one of the most famous Secret Agents ever created in fiction about the Second World War.

Much of the action of the story takes place inside the Soviet Union, commencing with Russia entering the war against Nazi Germany. There to counter Gregory's plans is his arch-enemy, Gruppenführer Grabber, as anxious as ever to settle the long-standing score which has existed between them, and as plot and counter-plot carry the story to a Swiss lakeside villa, the final scenes are played out in a sinister castle situated deep in the heart of a German forest. . . .

Known reprints:
1948, 1954, 1957
  (85th reprint cover for Come Into My Parlour) (85th reprint cover for Come Into My Parlour)  
  (85th Thousand)
circa 1948
1954; 1957  

The Launching Of Roger Brook
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Publication date:

[3 July 1947]

Series:

Roger Brook in an historical espionage adventure

 

Link to the
Roger Brook series in
chronological order

(link to The Launching Of Roger Brook notes) Publisher's synopsis:
This is the first of Dennis Wheatley's famous historical series in which appears the young man who was afterwards to become Prime Minister Pitt's most resourceful secret agent: Roger Brook.

The scene is the England of George III and the France of Marie Antoinette; the tale is that of the tall, blue-eyed Roger, who set out to seek fame and fortune in the year 1783.

He might never have set out at all had it not been for that ravishing creature, the wicked Georgina Thursby, and he most certainly would never have been involved in the secrets of French foreign policy had it not been for the fair Athénais de Rochambeau; but once on the way, his adventures provide us with an immense variety of entertainment.

Known reprints:
1950, 1953, 1957 & 4 other times
  (1953 reprint cover for The Launching of Roger Brook)  
  1953  

The Shadow Of Tyburn Tree
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(link to The Shadow Of Tyburn Tree notes) Publication date:

[6 May 1948]

Series:

A Roger Brook historical espionage novel

 

Link to the
Roger Brook series in
chronological order

Publisher's synopsis:
The Shadow of Tyburn Tree tells the story of Roger Brook–Prime Minister Pitt's most resourceful secret agent–who, in 1788, is sent on a secret mission to the Russia of that beautiful and licentious woman Catherine the Great.  Chosen by her to become her lover, Roger is compelled to move with the utmost care, for if it was known that not only was he spying for two countries but also having an affair with the sadistic and vicious Natalia, he would meet certain death.

The story moves to Denmark and the tragedy of Queen Matilda, to Sweden and the amazing ride of King Gustavus to save Gothenborg, and finally back to England where Roger returns to the arms of his one great love, Georgina...

Known reprints:
December 1948, 1950, March 1953, March 1954
  (1951 reprint cover for The Haunting Of Toby Jugg) (1954 reprint cover for The Haunting Of Toby Jugg)  
  (45th Thousand,
Second Printing)
Dec 1948
March 1954  

The Haunting Of Toby Jugg
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Publication date:

[2 December 1948]

Series:

A one-off occult novel

Link to a listing of
Black Magic/Occult titles

(link to The Haunting Of Toby Jugg notes) Publisher's synopsis:

How is it that during the past hundred years so little interest has been taken in the Devil's activities?  The Haunting of Toby Jugg suggests an answer.  Woven into a tale of modern love and courage, of intrigue, hypnotism and Satan-worship, it propounds a theory that under a new disguise the Devil is still intensely active–that through his chosen emissaries he is nearer than ever before to achieving victory in his age-old struggle to become, in fact, as well as in name, the Prince of this World.

Known reprints:
January 1949, 1950, May 1951, August 1953, 1955, April 1956
  (1949 reprint cover for The Haunting Of Toby Jugg) (1951 reprint cover for The Haunting Of Toby Jugg)  
  January 1949 May 1951; April 1956  

The Rising Storm
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(link to The Rising Storm notes) Publication date:

[13 October 1949]

Series:

A Roger Brook historical espionage adventure

 

Link to the
Roger Brook series in
chronological order

Publisher's synopsis:

At Fontainebleau all seems peaceful and serene; Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette secure on their thrones. Yet as Roger Brook arrives on a secret and vital mission for Prime Minister Pitt, the smell of blood, of Revolution and the Terror is already in the air.

Intrigue, violence, suspicion – this is the maelstrom into which Roger is plunged at once. But with it: love. Isabella D'Arana is beautiful, Spanish – and married. Laws and conventions must be defied if he is to have her. Police and agents must be outwitted if he is to achieve his secret mission.

Known reprints:
n.d. (priced 7/6) , 1952, 1957
  (The Rising Storm 1957)  
  1957  

1749-1949 : The Seven Ages Of Justerini's
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Publication date:

[1949]

Series:

Justerini & Brooks: company history.

Revised and re-issued as 'The Eight Ages. . . ' in 1965.
The text from this and the 1965 revision was later used in the publication 'The Nine Ages of Justerini's' for their 250th anniversary.

See also: 'We move with the times' 1954.

(link to The Seven Ages Of Justerini's notes) Notes:

Written for the bi-centenary of Justerini & Brooks, wine and spirit merchants

Known reprints:
1953, 1957, 1960

. . . Of Vice And Virtue. An Eastern Romance top
Link to alphabetical index

Only one surviving copy is
known to exist of this novel
(Link for further details)
Publication date:

(1950)

Series:

A one-off romantic novel


(A romantic novel produced for propaganda purposes in the Middle-East)

The Second Seal
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Publication date:

[9 November] 1950

Series:

A Duc de Richleau historical espionage novel

 

Link to the
de Richleau series in
chronological order

(link to The Second Seal notes) Publisher's synopsis:
Spring 1914.  At a masked ball, the Duke de Richleau has an intriguing meeting with a beautiful woman.

An incident that was to lead the Duke into a series of desperate adventures as he became involved, firstly with The Black Hand, a Serbian, secret, terrorist society, and then, as a British secret agent, at the Austrian Supreme Headquarters.

Finally, at the Kaiser's headquarters, he was to take a hand in the Battle of the Marne – the operation that shattered Germany's chance of victory.

And through the violence, intrigue and hair's-breadth escapes, there runs also the story of a great love.

Known reprints:
1957
(1951 reprint cover for The Haunting Of Toby Jugg)
1957

The Early Adventures Of Roger Brook
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(link to The Early Adventures Of Roger Brook notes) Publication date:

[5 July 1951]

Series:

A Roger Brook compilation

Link to the
Roger Brook series in
chronological order

Link to a list
of all omnibuses

Notes:

Contains ‘The Launching Of Roger Brook’ and ‘The Shadow Of Tyburn Tree’.

Known reprints:
April 1953, March 1958
(The Early Adventures Of Roger Brook)
April 1953; March 1958

The Man Who Killed The King
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Link to alphabetical index
Publication date:

[8 November] 1951

Series:

A Roger Brook historical espionage adventure

 

Link to the
Roger Brook series in
chronological order

(link to The Man Who Killed The King notes) Publisher's synopsis:
The Man who Killed the King tells the story of Roger Brook–Prime Minister Pitt's most resourceful secret agent–during the Great Terror when more than a million people perished and the Terrorists found that the guillotine did not work quickly enough. This, the second phase of the French Revolution, opened with the storming of the Tuileries in June, 1792, and in the months that followed, the Liberals were mown down by cannon fire, drowned by the thousand, and flung back into the flames of villages burnt to the ground.

And amidst all this brutality and bloodshed, Roger Brook, a Commissar in Revolutionary Paris, faced terrifying hazards trying desperately to rescue Queen Marie Antoinette and other members of the Royal Family from a mob thirsting for revenge...

Known reprints:
January 1952, July 1955
(The Man Who Killed The King)
January 1952; July 1955

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